200 Alabama Bicentennial

Celebrating Alabama’s 200th birthday2017 2018 2019

  • Ordinance of Secession, adopted by the Alabama Constitutional Convention of 1861

    The ordinance declares that "the State of Alabama now withdraws, and is hereby withdrawn from the Union known as the United States of America, and henceforth ceases to be one of said United States, and is, and of right ought to be a Sovereign and Independent State." It also proposes the creation of a new government among states with similar interests: "An as it is the desire and purpose of the people of Alabama to meet the slaveholding states of the South who may approve such purpose in order to frame a provisional as well as permanent Government upon the principles of the Constitution of the United States."

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 10, 12 (US Government)

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  • Portrait of Jeremiah Clemens

    Clemens was appointed United States Attorney for the northern district of Alabama in 1838, and he was a member of the Alabama House of Representatives from 1839 to 1841. He served in the United States Senate from 1849 to 1853, and he was a delegate to the state's constitutional convention in 1861 (also known as the Secession Convention). He was a leader of the "cooperationists," who believed a southern convention of states should first meet before each one decided individually to secede.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 7 (Civics), 10, 12 (US Government)

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  • Excerpt from “Resignation of Hon. C.C. Clay, Jr. to His Excellency, A.B. Moore, Montgomery, Ala.”

    In this article, Clement Claiborne Clay, or C.C. Clay, Jr., tendered his resignation as Senator from Alabama in the U.S. Congress. The excerpt targets the election of Abraham Lincoln and the abolition movement as part of his rationale for resigning as well as for Alabama and other southern states to secede from the Union.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 7 (Civics), 10, 12 (US Government)

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  • “Secession, or Revolution.”

    This depicts an eagle holding a ribbon with the U.S. motto on it, "E Pluribus Unum." Around the image are the words that threaten "Secession, or Revolution."

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 7 (Civics), 10, 12 (US Government)

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  • Alabama Constitution of 1861

    Also known as the "Secession Constitution." The preamble states that "We, the people of the State of Alabama, having separated ourselves from the government known as the United States of America..." The constitution includes the following articles: declaration of rights; distribution of powers; legislative department; executive department and militia; judicial department and impeachment; general provisions; education; banking; and slavery. There are also two explanatory provisions. The first describes the change from the territorial to the state form of government, and the second describes the secession of Alabama from the United States. The document is written on 11 sheets of parchment, each page glued to the one below it; it is 20 feet and 8 inches long.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 7 (Civics), 10, 12 (US Government)

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  • Banking Article in Alabama Constitution of 1861

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 7 (Civics), 10, 12 (US Government)

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  • Education Article in Alabama Constitution of 1861

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 7 (Civics), 10, 12 (US Government)

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  • Slavery Article in Alabama Constitution of 1861

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 7 (Geography), 10, 12 (US Government)

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  • Constitution of the Confederate States of America

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 10, 12 (US Government)

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  • Section 9 of the Constitution of the Confederate States of America

    Section 9 deals with the institution of slavery and what the new Confederate States of America would and would not allow.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 7 (Civics), 10, 12 (US Government)

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  • Portrait of William Lowndes Yancey

    Yancey served in the Alabama House of Representatives in 1841, the Alabama Senate in 1843, and the United States House of Representatives from 1844 to 1846. He was a delegate to the constitutional convention of 1861 (also known as the Secession Convention), and he was a member of the Confederate Senate from 1862 to 1863.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 7 (Civics), 10, 12 (US Government)

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  • “The Convention”

    This article speculates what course the state will take after the Convention meets. It ponders whether the cooperationists or the secessionists will win out. Ultimately, however, the author expresses faith in the members of the Convention to "protect the rights, interest and honor of the State."

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 7 (Civics), 10, 12 (US Government)

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  • “Shame! Shame!!”

    This article represents the cooperationist view that the southern states should first meet together to organize before each individual state seceded.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 7 (Civics), 10, 12 (US Government)

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