200 Alabama Bicentennial

Celebrating Alabama’s 200th birthday2017 2018 2019

  • Two letters from W.H. Mitchell in Montgomery, AL to his wife, Martha, in Florence, AL

    In the first letter, written from the Exchange Hotel on January 10, 1861, Mitchell describes the tension and excitement in the city as they wait for the official declaration of Alabama's secession. He also discusses the lack of support for secession in the northern part of the state. In the second letter, written from the “Republic of Alabama!” on January 11, 1861, Mitchell announces Alabama's withdrawal from the Union and tells of the speeches and celebration that took place in downtown Montgomery. Mitchell was a Presbyterian minister in Florence, and he was president of the Florence Synodical Female College. He was known for his secessionist stance, and in 1862, while Florence was occupied by Federal troops, he was arrested for praying for the Confederacy's success.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 10, 12 (US Government)

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  • “Alabama Will Secede”

    This article discusses the likeliness that Alabama will secede from the Union: "A large majority of the members of our Convention will not hesitate a moment to co-operate with South Carolina, Florida and Mississippi in the formation of a Southern confederacy on the basis of the Constitution of the late United States as construed in the Dred Scott case. The Union is already dissolved, and we will at once set about the work of preserving our liberties and honor by uniting with those gallant Southern States that are determined not to live under the free negro rule of Lincoln."

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 10, 12 (US Government)

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  • “Alabama out of the Union!”

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 10, 12 (US Government)

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  • Constitution of the Confederate States of America

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 10, 12 (US Government)

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  • Ordinance of Secession, adopted by the Alabama Constitutional Convention of 1861

    The ordinance declares that "the State of Alabama now withdraws, and is hereby withdrawn from the Union known as the United States of America, and henceforth ceases to be one of said United States, and is, and of right ought to be a Sovereign and Independent State." It also proposes the creation of a new government among states with similar interests: "An as it is the desire and purpose of the people of Alabama to meet the slaveholding states of the South who may approve such purpose in order to frame a provisional as well as permanent Government upon the principles of the Constitution of the United States."

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 10, 12 (US Government)

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  • “The War Declared”

    The article argues that the United States government has effectively declared war on the South because it refused to receive a Confederate delegation or surrender Fort Sumter. The article also predicts that the Confederate forces will take the fort if it is not released soon.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 10, 12 (US Government)

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  • Letter from John E. Hall to his father, Bolling Hall

    In the letter John discusses the tense political climate across the country, the possibility of secession, and the necessity of fighting.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 10, 12 (US Government)

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  • Copy of a letter from E. Lewis in Montgomery, AL to Mr. Kerr in Kentucky

    In the letter, written an hour after Alabama formally seceded, Lewis describes the celebrations taking place in Montgomery, adding that even the ladies are in favor of secession. He discusses the taking of federal forts in Alabama and Florida; expresses his fear that war will be the result of the current events; and blames William Lowndes Yancey for his role in the secession.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 5, 10, 12 (US Government)

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