200 Alabama Bicentennial

Celebrating Alabama’s 200th birthday2017 2018 2019

Resources

  • Traveling in Jim Crow South

    Read the book "Ruth and the Green Book." Introduce students to the "Negro Motorist Green Book" either through pdf (attached) or through a copy of the book. Allow students to explore the lists of businesses and individuals who were willing to assist the African American travelers. Ask students to imagine that they are Ruth (or a brother), write a diary entry from the trip or a letter home to a friend telling them about the trip. Be Mr. Victor Green, write a page for your community--where could an African American traveler shop, rest, or eat in your community?

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 3, 4, 5

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  • Alabama County Relief

    Students will be assigned a county in Alabama that they will identify on the FERA map. Students will write about the relief project, the impact that it had on their county, and the significance of the project during that time period.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4

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  • The New Deal - WPA Poster Analysis

    Place students in groups of 3 or 4. Pass out the Primary Source Analysis Tool. Assign each group a WPA poster from the 1930s. Students will complete the Poster Analysis worksheet using questions to guide them. Students will then design a poster that addresses a similar issue today, employing similar graphic elements from the original WPA poster. Students will discuss and present the analysis of their assigned poster to classmates, and present their new posters.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4

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  • Interview with a former slave, Henry Cheatam

    Students will read and analyze a first hand account of slavery from Henry Cheatam who was interviewed during the 1930s as part of the Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States from Interviews with Former Slaves, Volume I, Alabama Narratives conducted by the Works Progress Administration. The link attached to the lesson is to a scanned copy of the original manuscript. Additionally, a copied Word document of the original manuscript and a slightly edited version where racially explicit language is taken out of the copy are attached.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4

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  • Proclamation 2189: Creating Conecuh National Forest

    Tell the students that they will be analyzing a presidential proclamation, learn how Congress gets involved by approving a new act to facilitate the proclamation, and each student (or team) will develop a proclamation pertaining to the environment in their local act.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 12 (US Government)

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  • What Makes an Olympian?

    After reading the story in our reading basal, "Jim Thorpe" I would introduce this picture to the students on the following day. I would ask questions. I would follow up with this by watching a short clip about Jesse Owens, showing them photos from the Jesse Owens museum and home, and talking about his life before and after the Olympics. Following this history lesson on Jesse Owens, I would extend this lesson by showing various clips and reading short articles on the Olympics today. To close this unit, I would have the students complete a Venn diagram that compared and contrasted the Olympics during Jesse Owens's time and the Olympics today.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4

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  • How Far Can You Jump?

    Ask students who is capable of running and jumping 26 feet. Show distance using measuring tape as well as referencing 1 tile equals 1 foot. Allow select students to participate by running/jumping. Select students will measure and record distance. Provide an example of the primary source from the Library of Congress. Introduce Jesse Owens as the man that could jump 26 feet. Explain the contributionst hat he made during this time frame.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4

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  • Life of Jesse Owens

    Display photo of Jesse Owens at the starting block at the 1936 Olympics. Ask students what they believe happened 30 seconds after the photo was taken. Give students time to reflect and share. Lesson on Jesse Owens's life and accomplishments.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4

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  • What Happened to the Trees?

    Give each set of partners the map of the longleaf pine forest. Guide them as they use their map skills to locate Alabama and use the map key to determine changes in the Longleaf Pine forest in the state over time. After discussion, give the students the three primary source pictures. Have students observe the pictures and write down what they observe. Use the primary source observation tool found on the Library of Congress website. Record answers to questions.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 3

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